Extraction


In most cases, a tooth may need to be pulled when other less radical procedures, such as filling or root can treatment, make it impossible or imprudent to save your child’s original tooth.

• Advanced anesthetic techniques today greatly minimize discomfort associated with a tooth extraction.

• First, the area surrounding the tooth is numbed to lessen any discomfort. After the extraction, your child is given a regimen to follow to ensure that no infection occurs and gum tissues heal properly.

• In most cases a small amount of bleeding is normal.

• Have your child avoid anything that might prevent normal healing. This includes vigorous rinsing of the mouth vigorously or drinking through a straw (the sucking action may promote swelling and opening of the extraction site). These activities could also dislodge the clot and delay healing.

• For the first few days, if rinsing is a necessity, rinse your child’s mouth gently. Afterward, for pain or swelling, apply a cold cloth or an ice bag. Ask our office about pain medication. Your child can brush and floss her other teeth as usual; but she mustn’t clean the teeth next to the tooth socket.

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